An image of a single honey bee.

“Bee” Careful Out There, Phoenix!

Plants and trees are starting to come into full bloom, and they’re like a siren call to bees everywhere! The nectar from the blooming vegetation is a veritable cornucopia of food to them. As bee activity increases, so does the potential for aggression when they swarm to build and protect their hives and gather food. You may notice them flying around trees and bushes, where they are normally not a threat if left alone. You could also see them swarm in and form up into a ball either on a flat surface, a hanging tree branch, or in shrubbery. If they decide they don’t like the area, you’re in luck! They will eventually scatter and move on. But if they find the spot appealing, they’ll most likely decide to set up housekeeping somewhere nearby: under a shed, on the exterior of a house, or they may find a crack in the exterior of a structure. They have also been known to set up in water meter boxes and irrigation channels – there’s no telling where they will set up shop! After two weeks of establishing their new nest, they tend to become very aggressive to protect the hive. This is especially true with regard to the Africanized honey bee, a particularly aggressive (and potentially fatal) species of bee that accounts for a large number of bee infestations in the Valley. It’s also known as the “killer bee”, which is never a good thing. You can learn more about bees here. If you spot a beehive on your property, give us a call immediately! We’ll have you and your family safe in no time.

An image of a swarm of bees on a block wall.

A “ball” of bees swarming on the wall of an elementary school in the East Valley.

How do I recognize a beehive?

You’ll likely hear them before you see them, and hopefully before you feel them. The distinctive buzzing of thousands of bees coming out of a hive is hard to miss. If you think you hear a swarm near by, be sure to get far away as soon as possible – and call us right away! We’ll be out in no time to assess

What should someone do if they’ve been attacked by a swarm of bees? What if I’m allergic to bee stings?

If you’re being attacked by a swarm of bees, get indoors immediately! Carefully remove the stinger by scraping it out with a credit card or similar item and call a medical professional or poison control center for further treatment advice. Keep in mind, if you do not remove the stinger, the venom will usually continue to pump into your body. If you are allergic, you should seek medical attention right away to avoid further injury, and possibly death.

Of course, they’re not all bad…

Bees perform a vital function in our ecosystem by pollinating plants and providing honey. However, when they establish themselves in or near residential communities and businesses, they can pose a significant hazard. Let the professionals at Absolute Exterminating keep you and your family out of harm’s way!

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